Curing the Incurable — Whether Autism or Cancer, Conventional Medicine Avoids the “C” Word: “Cure”

November 4, 2008
Category: Uncategorized

The new Us Weekly has an article about actress Jenny McCarthy’s battle with pediatricians over the health of her son, who she says became autistic after a routine vaccination. McCarthy says he was cured through a wheat- and dairy-free diet, but doctors have accused her of creating fear of necessary vaccines.

AAHF believes consumers deserve objective information in order to make an informed decision about vaccination for themselves and their children. The Boston Globe recently published an article on the subject, which raised the fear level for many Americans.

With the incidence of autism and other learning and behavior disorders at an all-time high, many parents refuse to accept anything less than actual cures for their children’s challenges. Ken Bock, M.D., author of Healing the New Childhood Epidemics: Autism, ADHD, Asthma, and Allergies: The Groundbreaking Program for the 4-A Disorders, chronicles the 1600% increase of these four diagnoses in the past twenty years. Yet the Autism Research Institute, the Pfeiffer Treatment Center, and integrative physicians like Dr. Bock offer hope to their patients: many children are able to return to normal, even though conventional medicine is critical that such claims may be offering patients “false hope.”

Consider the following cutting-edge research on the subject:

• A study published in the current journal Environmental Health found that many pesticides currently in use could damage brain growth in fetuses and in young children.

• The work of NIH researcher Mark Levine published in the Canadian Medical Journal demonstrated the selective ability of vitamin C to kill cancer cells, leaving normal cells untouched.

• In his book Curing the Incurable, Tom Levy, M.D., J.D., makes the case that any disease or condition addressed by a vaccine can be cured—yes, he too uses the “c” word—by the intravenous use of vitamin C.

• And the work of Dr. Jeanne Drisko at University of Kansas has been instrumental in furthering the research about vitamin C for cancer patients.

In the upcoming session of Congress, AAHF will address scientific freedom of speech with important legislative efforts, and we will be alerting you to write your elected officials to support specific legislation. Until then, please support mothers like Jennie McCarthy who refuse to believe in anything less than a cure for their child.

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