The Texas Medical Practice Act—A Model for 49 Other States

March 31, 2009
Category: Uncategorized

State medical boards across the country routinely target doctors who practice outside the rigid norm of conventional medicine. Some states, like Kentucky and North Carolina, banned the entire profession of integrative and nutritionally oriented physicians from practicing in years past. Other states, like Connecticut and Texas, are notorious for their vigorous assaults against physicians who use tools that include nutrition to help heal their patients.

Robban Sica, MD, a well-known Connecticut integrative physician, was so harassed that she took her battle to federal court. The court found that the Connecticut board of medicine and the administrative system acted outside their scope of power and due process by “making up the rules as they went along.” Other physicians, though, have lost everything in a battle to retain their license to practice medicine.

Organizations like the American Association of Physicians and Surgeons (AAPS) have long championed physicians’ rights. AAPS believes that physicians—not government public health officials—should decide the vaccine schedule for patients. They say that by making such decisions, government bodies are in effect practicing medicine, and are ignoring the rights of both physicians and patients. The general counsel for AAPS has now joined one of Texas’ most visible integrative physicians, Steven Hotze, MD, in drafting a bill designed to comprehensively revise the Texas Medical Practice Act. Should this bill become the law of Texas, the struggle for health freedom will have made a giant step forward.

We are calling on every Texas physician who values the right to practice good medicine without intrusion by the government and vested interests, and every patient who wants medical care from the practitioner of their choice, to join together and support the comprehensive revision of the Texas Medical Practice Act. This principle—protecting the right of the consumer to choose, and the practitioner to practice—is the very foundation of AAHF. Learn more about Dr. Steven Hotze’s efforts, and more details about the Texas Medical Practice Act, by going to www.txppr.org.

One response to “The Texas Medical Practice Act—A Model for 49 Other States”

  1. Stephen Smith, M.D. says:

    Wow. I wish I had known of you guys sooner. I am a huge advocate for changing the Medical Practice Act.

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